15. February 2018
Hormonal vs Non-Hormonal IUD’s Choosing a method of contraception is a very individualized and personal decision for women—the best pill, best patch, or best IUD for you might not be the right choice for your best friend, and vice versa. When it comes to the most effective methods, experts strongly urge the use of LARCs, or long-acting reversible contraceptives. These set-it-and-forget-it methods include the implant and a handful of different IUDs, which collectively boast the lowest...
15. February 2018
Life After The IUD Removal – What to Expect when Removing your IUD IUDs, also known as intrauterine devices, are little T-shaped or spherical-shaped instruments that reside snugly inside the uterus and ward off pregnancy with a variety of mechanisms. The hormonal kinds release levonorgestrel, a synthetic form of the hormone progestin, to prevent ovulation, thicken cervical mucous, and thin the lining of the uterus. The non-hormonal IUD releases copper ions, which are toxic to sperm. For most...
15. February 2018
Sex and the IUD: All You Need to Know Choosing to have an IUD fitted may be one of the most liberating things a woman can choose to do for herself in the 21st century. She has chosen a (likely) hormone-free solution for birth control, which is easily reversible and will last her up to five years of protection against unwanted pregnancy. That being said, we already know the major health benefits of an IUD or IUB are expansive, but what about when it comes to intercourse? This is an issue many...
11. February 2018
IUD Fitment – What is it Like to Have an IUD Fitted? IUDs (intra-uterine devices) and IUB’s (intra-uterine balls) are very effective, convenient, long acting, and have very high satisfaction rates compared to other methods. They don’t require remembering anything (like taking a pill every day) and are safe for women who cannot use birth control containing oestrogen. They can be removed at any time by a doctor if you do not like them or want to get pregnant. IUDs are rapidly reversible,...
11. February 2018
How to Check the Strings of Your IUD / IUB Device Congratulations! You’ve just joined the school of women who have decided to set and forget their birth control for at least five years, and have decided to do away with the nasty side effects of traditional types of hormonal birth control. You may have noticed a slightly unwelcome new friend, those pesky strings that are attached to your IUD or IUB device. Why are they there and what can you do about them? We’ve got you covered. IUD Strings...
11. February 2018
How Do IUD’s Work as an Emergency Contraceptive? Emergency contraception is a way to prevent pregnancy if: · You had sex without using birth control. · Your birth control method failed. Maybe you forgot to take your pill or get your shot, the condom broke or came off, or your diaphragm slipped. · You were sexually assaulted. Even if you were using birth control, emergency contraception can help decrease your chance of getting pregnant. · If you had sex without birth control, there is a...
29. January 2018
IUD Question Answered – From the Day of Fitting to Years Down the Line Getting a T-shaped stick or ball-shaped string of copper spheres inserted into you may sound like no-go territory, but more women are becoming interested in this birth control method: IUD-related appointments have seen a 19 percent increase since November 2016, and we expect a bit of a “non-baby-boom” with the introduction of more advanced, safer forms of Intra-Uterine devices. But what about all the questions you’re...
29. January 2018
Periods and Non-Hormonal IUD’s – All You Need to Know There are many different types of birth control options available today. An intrauterine device (IUD) earns high marks for being “failproof” and highly effective. As with many types of birth control, you may experience side effects while using an IUD. It’s also important to know your allowances and limitations in terms of what feminine hygiene products you can safely use once your IUD has been fitted. Will I Get a Heavier Period...
29. January 2018
Contraceptives and Diabetes – What Women With Diabetes Need to Consider Before Going onto Birth Control A thorough study sought to find out the safety of hormonal contraception regarding thromboembolic events in women with both type 1 and 2 diabetes. Researchers used data from 2002-2011 in Clinformatics Data Mart to pinpoint women in the US between ages 14 and 44 who had diabetes and a prescription for a diabetes medication or device. Then they looked at contraceptive claims and compared time...
29. January 2018
Hormonal Contraceptives and the Big C - All Your Health Concerns Addressed According to a Danish study, contraceptives that use hormones, including birth control pills and intrauterine devices (IUDs), slightly increase the risk of breast cancer. But the importance of the increase is unique to each woman and depends on many factors, including: her age her general health her personal risk of breast cancer other breast cancer risk factors, such as smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, and...

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