The Most Surprising Benefits of Non-Hormonal Birth Control

The Most Surprising Benefits of Non-Hormonal Birth Control

The Most Surprising Benefits of Non-Hormonal Birth Control

 

If you’ve recently come off hormonal birth control or you’re planning to in the near future, it’s likely that you’re all too aware of the drawbacks of synthetic-hormone based contraceptives. You’ve probably experienced at least some of the myriad side effects - whether it was mood swings or hair loss or chronic fatigue - which pushed you to consider the non-hormonal birth control. Often the decision seems a necessity, rather than a choice - you just know that you want and need to feel better. The benefits of hormone free birth control seem clear - namely, it’s not hormonal birth control!

 

Non hormonal birth control becomes a gateway to body positivity. Fertility awareness-based methods for avoiding pregnancy foster this totally different relationship with the body when compared to hormonal drugs and invasive devices. Learning how your body works and working with, rather than against, how it works creates a whole new way of living in your body.

 

Non-Hormonal IUD – The IUD or IUB

How it works: A doctor inserts the small t-shaped device into the uterus, which affects the way sperm moves and prevents it from joining an egg. It also alters the lining of the uterus.

 

Success rate: Less than one out of 100 women will get pregnant while using an IUD.

 

Pros: It's safe, effective, and reversible, and it won't impact your hormones. While an IUD costs between $500 and $1,000 up front, it can last up to 12 years. If you have insurance, it's covered for free under the Affordable Care Act. It might also protect women from endometrial cancer.

Cons: An IUD does not protect against STIs. The common myth that it can cause infertility is not true. However, if you have an IUD inserted while you have an STI, you could increase your chance of infertility.

 

Non-Hormonal IUD – The Sponge

How it works: The Today Sponge, the only brand available, is a plastic foam sponge that contains spermicide. It covers the cervix while also continuously releasing spermicide.

 

Success rate: Among women who have never given birth, nine out of 100 of them will become pregnant using the sponge. If these same women do not always use it correctly, 16 out of 100 will become pregnant. It will not impact your hormones.

 

Pros: You can buy it over the counter, and you can have sex as many times as you like during the first 24 hours of wearing it. It's also included in the Affordable Care Act's free birth control mandate.

 

Cons: It does not protect against STIs, and it can be expensive bought over the counter ($17 for a package of three). Plus, it can be difficult to insert or cause messy or dry sex.

 

Non-Hormonal IUD – The Male Condom

How it works: A condom prevents sperm from entering the vagina.

Success rate: If used correctly, only two out of 100 women will become pregnant. Among women whose partners do not always use them correctly, 15 out of 100 will become pregnant.

 

Pros: Condoms are simple, easy to get, and cheap and prevent STIs. They can also keep your partner erect longer.

Cons: They might dull sensation or interrupt intercourse.

 

Non-Hormonal IUD – The Female Condom

How it works: Placed inside the vagina, the female condom collects semen when a man ejaculates.

 

Success rate: If used correctly, only five out of 100 women will become pregnant. Among women who do not always use it correctly, 21 out of 100 will become pregnant.

 

Pros: It protects against STIs and can be used for vaginal or anal intercourse. If you're allergic to latex condoms, these can be a good option.

Cons: It could cause irritation, slip into the vagina during intercourse, reduce feeling, or cause some noise, much like the male condom.

Non-Hormonal IUD – The Cervical Cap

How it works: A cervical cap is a silicone cup you insert over your cervix along with spermicide.

Success rate: Of women who have never given birth, 14 out of 100 will become pregnant. For those who have given vaginal birth, 29 out of 100 will become pregnant.

Pros: It works similar to a diaphragm, and will last up to two years.

Cons: It has similar drawbacks as the diaphragm: it cannot be used during menstruation, might be hard to insert, and does not protect against STIs. Plus, it requires a prescription.

 

In short, the only non-hormonal contraceptive which is a “set and forget” method and will last the longest is the IUD or IUB.

 

For more info on the CopperPearls IUB, click here to get in touch with us today!